National Security Conference 2018

National Security Conference 2018

You are invited to attend our 2nd annual National Security International Conference which aims to bring together leading academic scientists, national security experts, practitioners, researchers and scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Preventing Terrorism and Countering Violent Extremism. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for this group to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Preventing Terrorism and Countering Violent Extremism. At this Conference, you can expect to be updated on these measures to see among other things, how effectively they have been implemented.

  • Call for Papers
  • Key Themes and Topics 
  • Featured Presenters

 

The University of the Southern Caribbean cordially invites you to submit abstracts for panels, individual paper presentations and poster presentations.  Deadline date is September 30th, 2018

The proposals should consist of a title and a 300-word abstract which should be prepared for a blind review and sent to natseconference@usc.edu.tt.  This must be accompanied by a cover letter including the name, affiliation and contact details of the author/s.  Proposed panels should contain at least 3 and no more than 4 presenters, and panel chair must be named as the "main author". The deadline date for submission of proposals is September 30th 2018.  Abstracts will be peer-reviewed and the authors of the accepted proposals will be expected to submit the complete power point presentation/papers two weeks before the Conference.  Authors are expected to present their papers in person. Selected papers will be published.

All poster presentations should capture the key elements of the research and should be visually captivating.  Adequate use must be made of text, graphics, photographs and illustrations.  Your poster should be 841mm x 594mm.  A special prize will be awarded for the best poster.

 


 
1. STRATEGY AND EDUCATION IN COUNTERING VIOLENT EXTREMISM (CVE) 
i. Accountability, Legitimacy and Trust in Counterterrorism
ii. Strategic Approach to Countering Terrorism and Countering Violent Extremism
iii. Holistic Approaches from Education to De-Radicalization
iv. Understanding Violent Extremism and Radicalization that Lead to Terrorism (drivers of violent extremism)
v. Terrorists, Victims and Society
vi. Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and its Consequences
vii. The Causes of Terrorism and Comparative Politics
viii. Countering Violent Extremism and Radicalization that Lead to Terrorism
 
2. THE ROLE OF THE STATE AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IN PREPAREDNESS FOR CVE AND CT
i. Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy including the role of the United Nations
ii. Terrorism and Political Violence
iii. CARICOM Counterterrorism Strategy
iv. CVE and Terrorism applications in Trinidad and Tobago
v. Inter-agency Co-ordination and Referral Mechanisms
 
3.THE ROLE OF YOUTH IN PREVENTING AND COUNTERING VIOLENT EXTREMISM
i. Push and Pull Factors Enabling Violent Extremism
ii. Access to Education
 
4. HUMAN RIGHTS, CVE AND CT
i. Criminal-Justice Aspects in Countering Terrorism
ii. Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms Particularly at Stake in Preventing Terrorism and Countering Violent Extremism
iii. Equality and Non-Discrimination
iv.Measures to Ensure the Human Rights Compliance and Accountability of Police Actions for Counterterrorism                                         
5. ROLE OF THE COMMUNITY IN CVE AND CT
i. Community-Based/Targeted Approaches to Counterterrorism
ii. The Community Safety and Security Paradigm
iii. Community Cohesion and Community Resilience
iv. Engaging with Communities to Prevent Terrorism and Counter Violent Extremism
v. Engaging with Specific Groups on Preventing Terrorism
vi. Engaging with Faith-based Organizations and Religious Leaders
vii. Engaging with Ethnic Minorities
viii. Engaging with Civil Society Organizations
ix. Engaging with Small and Medium-sized Businesses
x. Anticipating the Reactions of Members of the Public to Police Engagement
 
6. WOMEN’S ENGAGEMENT IN VIOLENT EXTREMISM (VE) CVE AND CT
i. Case studies of Trinidadian women in ISIS)
ii. The case of hostage-taking and its ramifications (Boko Haram)
iii. Women as Silent Enablers/Collaborators in CVE, CT, and VE
iv. Women, because of Gender are Versatile players in CVE CT 
v. Good practices of women in CVE and CT
a) Women are Strategically Placed/Positioned - able to be extremely effective, as they can go undetected
b) Women as Potential Forces of De-Radicalization within their communities due to their relationships as wives and mothers of men who are at risk of being indoctrinated.
c) Empowered - As Gate-keepers of the Household are naturally empowered which in effect can be filtered at Community and National Levels
vi. The Gender Dimensions of VE Remain Neglected in Both Research and Practice
a) This gap has led to oversights in every aspect of CVE - From prevention to the role of security services, to prosecution.
b) Women too often seen as victims as opposed to inherent allies
c) Gendered nature of CVE in Recent Years
d) The need for CVE to be looked at through a gendered lens.
 
7. ROLE OF THE MEDIA IN CVE AND CT
i. Freedom of Expression
ii. Freedom of the Media
iii. Freedom of Thought, Conscience, Religious Belief, Peaceful Assembly and Freedom of Association
iv. Respect for Private and Family Life
v. Communicating and Exchanging Information with the Public
vi. Communicating with the Public on Counterterrorism
vii. Exchanging Information with Communities
 
8. COMMUNITY - POLICING APPROACH TO PREVENTING TERRORISM AND COUNTERING VIOLENT EXTREMISM
i. The Interplay between Community Policing and Intelligence-led Policing
ii. Tasking and Training for Community Police Officers
iii. Policies and Standard Operating Procedures
iv. Community Police Team Learning and Development
v. Five-Element Model for Community Police Intervention
vi. Parameters of Police Engagement with Communities
vii. Evaluating the Impact of Community Policing Approaches to Preventing Terrorism and Countering Violent Extremism
 
9. FIGHTING RADICALIZATION AND VIOLENT EXTREMISM IN CYBERSPACE
i. Countering violent extremism: video power and social media
ii. Explore ways to counter violent extremism in cyberspace
iii. Terrorist use of cyberspace and cyber Terrorism
iv. Counter youth radicalization and violent extremism in cyberspace
v. Counter terrorist/violent extremism narratives
vi. Solutions to detect and analyze online radicalization
vii. Social media analytics to identify and counter violent extremism
 
The deadline date for all proposals is September 30th 2018.

 

Return for a full listing of our key presenters 

Conference Details and Costs


Conference Details 

It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for this group to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Preventing Terrorism and Countering Violent Extremism. With technological advancements and changing narratives of globalization, terrorism has also undergone considerable transformation.

Today, the agents of terror are far more tech-savvy and globally connected, with an aim of achieving their objectives through continuous innovation. They no longer need an umbrella of any organization as they are capable of carrying out lone wolf attacks. The ideological commitment is stronger and thus the absence of command and control infrastructure is incapable of posing any hindrance. The rise in terrorism and violent extremism in the global arena in the 21st century has created severe security threats as this growing phenomenon has resulted in death, destruction and instability in the countries and regions where extremists and terrorist groups operate. 

Many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have porous borders, limited law enforcement capabilities, and established smuggling routes. These vulnerabilities offered opportunities to local and international terrorist groups and posed challenges to governments in the region. Together with other countries, the Caribbean – particularly Trinidad and Tobago – were sources of foreign terrorist fighters in 2016; the return of these trained foreign terrorist fighters is of great concern. Coordinated and harmonized efforts to counter terrorism and violent extremism are underway among and between states, together with regional, continental and international organizations.

These efforts include collaboration on border security, sharing intelligence, and the development of strategies and frameworks, such as CARICOM Counter-terrorism Strategy; the African Union’s (AU) Counter Terrorism Framework and the United Nations’ (UN) Global Counter-terrorism Strategy. At this Conference, we expect to be updated on these measures to see among other things, how effectively they have been implemented. The endurance of terrorism and the rise of violent extremist groups around the world highlight the limits of conventional approaches to counter them. Many years of experience has proven that heavy-handed approaches and a single-minded focus on security measures are inadequate in the global fight against terrorism. What we really need is a broader and smarter approach to reverse the tide of terrorism – one that goes beyond countering terrorists with military and law enforcement tactics.

An effective strategy should incorporate efforts aimed at preventing people from becoming terrorists in the first place. Only then can we ensure that the terrorists who are eliminated physically, through the use of force, are not replaced. That is how sustainable progress can be made in the fight against terrorism

Early Bird Rates 

• US$200.00/person  (ends October 15, 2018)

• US$200.00/person Group of 5 persons or more (ends October 15, 2018)  
This rate applies to a group of five or more persons representing the same Ministry or organization


Regular Rates 

• US$250.00/ person  

• US$200.00/person in a Group of 5 persons or more (From May 7, 2015).
This rate applies to a group of five or more persons representing the same Ministry or organization

 

Student Rate 

• US$150.00/person 

To qualify for this rate one must be currently registered in a full-time program of Study at a University

Presenter Rate

• US$150.00/person 
This rate only applies to persons presenting papers at the Conference 

*NB: The Conference Coordinator will assist participants to book hotel accommodations at discounted prices upon request.

Register